Blog Tour Review: Not Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson

Not Now Not Ever_cover imageNot Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson

Published November 21, 2017, by Wednesday Books.

YA > Contemporary

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Lily Anderson’s debut novel The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You took Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing and reimagined it as a fandom filled YA novel that resonated with readers. Now, building on her nerd approved and classic rom-com based plots, Anderson’s sophomore novel, NOT NOW, NOT EVER is a play on The Importance of Being Ernest with all the geeky fun that made her debut beloved. Anderson introduces her fierce heroine Elliot and sends her to nerd summer camp where hijinks are sure to ensue.

Elliot is very clear on what she isn’t going to do this summer.
1. She isn’t going to stay home in Sacramento, where she’d have to sit through her stepmother’s sixth community theater production of The Importance of Being Earnest. No thank you.
2. She also isn’t going to mock trial camp at UCLA. (Ugh.)
3. And she certainly isn’t going to the Air Force summer program on her mom’s base in Colorado Springs. As cool as it would be to live-action-role-play Ender’s Game, Ellie’s seen three generations of her family go through USAF boot camp up close, and she knows that it’s much less Luke/Yoda/“feel the force,” and much more one hundred push-ups on three
days of no sleep. And that just isn’t appealing, no matter how many Xenomorphs from Alien she’d be able to defeat afterwards.

What she is going to do is pack up her determination, her favorite Octavia Butler novels, and her Jordans, and run away to summer camp. Specifically, a cutthroat academic-decathlon-like competition for a full scholarship to Rayevich College—the only college with a Science Fiction Literature program, and her dream school. She’s also going to start over as Ever Lawrence: a new name for her new beginning. She’s even excited to spend her summer with the other nerds and weirdos in the completion, like her socially-awkward roommate with neon-yellow hair, and a boy who seriously writes on a typewriter and is way cuter than is comfortable or acceptable.

The only problem with her excellent plan to secretly win the scholarship and a ticket to her future: her golden-child, super-genius cousin Isaiah has had the same idea, and has shown up at Rayevich smugly ready to steal her dreams and expose her fraud in the process. With a persistent female lead and delightful rom-com update to Oscar Wilde, NOT NOW, NOT EVER is witty and fun—sure to entertain even the non-nerdy reader.

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Review: A Hundred Hours of Night by Anna Woltz


26626215A Hundred Hours of Night by Anna Woltz

Published May 10, 2016, by Arthur A. Levine Books.

YA > Contemporary

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Part love letter to New York, part portrait of a girl and a city in crisis as Hurricane Sandy hits New York City.

When Emilia de Wit ran away to New York City, she planned everything to a T. Plane ticket, purchased. Cute apartment, rented online. Subway map, printed and highlighted. This was no ordinary trip — this was Emilia’s declaration of independence. Her chance to escape the life her parents were ruining. To get away from the horrible scandal that had rocked Amsterdam, the scandal that was all her dad’s fault. To see if her mom, the glamorous, world-famous artist, would even notice.

New York steals Emilia’s heart at first sight — even though absolutely nothing goes to plan. She didn’t plan to end up homeless on a stranger’s doorstep. She didn’t plan to make friends with Seth, Abby, and Jim. And she could never have known that Hurricane Sandy would be barreling up the coast, straight for the city.

All she wanted was to get away from her parents, her problems, her life . . . and when the storm hits and the power goes out, Emilia feels farther from home than she could have imagined.

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Look What You Made Me Do | Taylor Swift Book Tag, Part 2


Oh, look what you made me do!

Way back in 2014, I did the Taylor Swift Book Tag. Since then, it’s arguably been one of my most viewed posts, and it’s one of my favorites here on the blog! I thought I’d adapt the 1989 and (beginning of) the reputation eras into the book tag! If you haven’t heard her new music, listen and then come back! Her new album releases in 10 DAYS I CAN’T WAIT.

I also want to take a minute to acknowledge Taylor’s incredible narrative skill. Each of her music videos are so incredibly detailed and tell such full stories. We need to get a fiction novel from her sometime, please! She’s proven she can totally handle ANY subgenre.


Welcome to New York

“the lights are so bright, but they never blind me”

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Name your favorite city or setting for a book, real or fictional.

Actually, New York City! I’ve never been, but I love the way it’s portrayed in all of the books I read. Also, any book set on the coast by a beach! I love to escape when I’m reading, so places that I’ve never been, or wish I could visit more often are always my favorites. If we’re talking fictional worlds, I mean, Hogwarts, obviously!

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Book Photography & Blogging | The Rise of Bookstagram & Do Photos Make for Better Posts?


At the beginning of this summer, I began to start heavily using my blog’s Instagram, or “Bookstagram,” account. Considering the thousands (probably more like millions) of book-centric accounts on the social media platform, I was late to the game. Yet, I’ve slowly begun using it; building my profile, creating a feed “theme,” taking advantage of Instagram’s stories (I much prefer using Instagram stories over Snapchat, feeling that it’s not as private as Snapchat can be), and interacting with authors, publishers, and other readers in a new way! I’m a sucker for a beautiful cover and book design, so naturally, I fell into loving to take bookish photos! I’ve also started adding them into my posts here on the blog since I posted my redesign.

With this rise in book photography and aesthetic in the book community, I can understand why bloggers are feeling the need to post more visuals alongside their written posts. Normal digital graphics aren’t as eye-catching and engaging as looking at a pretty image of a new book with a text overlay. I personally started adding photos when I switched to a simple black and white blog design theme. I let the images bring color to the blog, so it’s always kind of changing!

But I’ve been starting to wonder: Does including visuals, particularly book photos, make for better posts? 

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Review: Julia Vanishes by Catherine Egan

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27426221Julia Vanishes (The Witch’s Child, #1) by Catherine Egan

Published June 7, 2016, by Knopf Books for Young Readers.

YA > Fantasy

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Julia has the unusual ability to be…unseen. Not invisible, exactly. Just beyond most people’s senses.

It’s a dangerous trait in a city that has banned all forms of magic and drowns witches in public Cleansings. But it’s a useful trait for a thief and a spy. And Julia has learned—crime pays.

Her latest job is paying very well indeed. Julia is posing as a housemaid in the grand house of Mrs. Och, where an odd assortment of characters live and work: A disgraced professor who keeps forbidden books and sends her to fetch parcels containing bullets, spiders, and poison. An aristocratic houseguest who is locked in the basement each night. And a mysterious young woman with an infant son who is clearly hiding—though from what or whom?

Worse, Julia has a creeping suspicion that there’s a connection between these people and the killer leaving a trail of bodies across the frozen city.

The more she learns, the more she wants to be done with this unnatural job. To go back to the safety of her friends and fellow thieves. But Julia is entangled in a struggle between forces more powerful than she’d ever imagined. Escape will come at a terrible price.

And even a girl who can vanish can’t walk away from her own worst deeds.

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